Haute Culture

A French icon, Joan of Arc might never have lived in Paris, but she has made an indelible mark on the capital of the country she so loved. Artistic depictions of Joan abound and make for a fun treasure hunt for fans of the beloved saint.

Place des Pyramides

Joan of Arc Paris

The most famous of all of Paris’s Joan of Arc tributes is this gilded-bronze equestrian statue, on Rue de Rivoli by the western tip of the Louvre. It dates back to 1874, and was created by Emmanuel Frémiet (who was celebrated for his animal sculptures; the elephant outside the Musée d’Orsay is also his).

Cour Puget, the Louvre

Joan of Arc Paris

This lovely marble statue is called Joan Listening to her Voices. It was originally commissioned in 1845 for the Jardin du Luxembourg, but was moved to the Louvre museum in 1872 when the statue was deemed too delicate for the elements. (Ironically so, considering how fearless Joan was in real life!)

161-3 Rue Saint-Honoré

Joan of Arc Paris

Look up to see the plaque that marks the spot of the old Porte Saint-Honoré city gate, where Joan was injured during the 1429 Siege of Paris, when the capital was held by the English and Burgundians. To read more about the battle, visit this website.

The Panthéon

Joan of Arc Paris

A stunning wall fresco depicts scenes from Joan’s life. It was painted between 1886-90 by Jules-Eugène Lenepveu (who had also created the Palais Garnier’s original ceiling, which would be covered up by Marc Chagall’s more radical design in 1964).

Église Saint-Augustin

Joan of Arc Paris

In front of this eighth-arrondissement church is a 1900 bronze cast of an equestrian statue that was originally submitted by sculptor Paul Dubois to the Paris Salon in 1889.

Sacré-Cœur

Joan of Arc Paris

Another bronze equestrian statue, this one by Hippolyte Lefèbvre from 1927, stands on the eastern edge of the front porch of Sacre-Cœur. (Lefèbvre also sculpted the twin statue, a horseback Saint-Louis, on the other side.)

Pont de Bir-Hakeim

Joan of Arc Paris

In the middle of this bridge, looking back to the Eiffel Tower, is a 1930 sculpture, a gift from the Danish people, that was originally a depiction of Joan of Arc. Many locals, however, thought it too aggressive and war-like, and so diplomatic efforts had the artwork’s name changed to La France Renaissante.

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